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Monday, June 22, 2015

OBSERVING REPORT FOR JUNE 19, 2015

Location:  Front yard at Little Lepreau, NB, Canada

Date Time:  June 19, 2015 2115-2230hrs

Weather:  Clear, slight breeze, 9C, and lots of Mosquitoes.

Attendance:  Jessica K, a Neighbor, and Myself.

Equipment: Meade 8" LX 200 with focal reducer, 19mm and 9mm eyepieces, Samsung Nexus 4 cellphone camera with Ioptron cellphone adapter, Canon Rebel Xsi with 18-55mm and 75-300mm lenses

Objective:  To view and image Crescent Moon/Venus/Jupiter Conjunction which is suppose to peak on June 30.

Report:  This short observing session was all about the conjunction.  The flies were bad, but other than that the conditions were ideal for observing.

Had the scope set up by 2130, by then it was still light out.  Guessed where Regulus was(knowing it was above Jupiter, in the West) then aligned the scope in that direction.  Slewed the scope to Jupiter, then corrected the scope to take advantage of its tracking capabilities.

Took daylight images of Jupiter, Venus and the Moon.  It was hard to tease out detail on Jupiter, because it was too bright out, but three of its moons were visible.

Venus was in its 'Quarter Moon' phase, but closes-up images did not turn out well.

The focal reducer may also have negatively affected close-up images of Jupiter and Venus.  However, on the Moon, it allowed the whole disk to fit into the cellphone view screen.  This allowed for some nice video and images that showed Earth shine.

Jessica came out and viewed the Moon on the view screen of the cellphone.  She asked, "How did the craters get there?"  She also commented on how many craters there are.  I explained that the craters come from asteroid impacts.

A neighbor, who happened to be driving by stopped in and looked over my setup.  He commented on his setup and was amazed at all the electronics that I had attached to the telescope.  He also viewed a video of the crescent Moon.

One satellite and no shooting stars were seen.

Jupiter and two of its moons.






Three of Jupiter's Moons can be seen if you zoom in.
video

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